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American Psychiatric Association Creates Guidelines for Race Dysphoria

Race dysphoria: involves a conflict between a person’s physical or assigned race and the race which they identify with. People with race dysphoria are described as being uncomfortable with the race they were assigned with, particularly uncomfortable with their skin color or being uncomfortable with the expected hardship associated with that race.

People with race dysphoria may experience difficulties functioning due to this conflict. This conflict can change the person’s behavior, they way they dress, speak, and social relationships.

People with race dysphoria may choose to express their true selves and dress like white women, speak like white women who enjoy police privilege, and even call 911 like white women.

A diagnosis of gender dysphoria is made when a patient fulfills the following criteria;

  1. A marked incongruence between a person’s experienced or expressed race and racial characteristics.
  2. A strong desire to be rid of the person’s race characteristics.
  3. A strong desire for the characteristics of the other race.
  4. A strong desire to be of the other race.
  5. A strong desire to be treated as the other race.
  6. A strong feeling that one has the typical feeling and reactions of the other race.

Treatment for race dysphoria includes cognitive and behavioral therapy, brightening the skin color, and race reassignment plastic surgery. CBT involves individual and family therapy to help the individual cope with the distress and conflict of their race. Some adults may only choose to identify with the other and be treated as the other gender without undergoing procedures that alter their body.

Complications of race dysphoria include stigmatization, discrimination, and increased risk of mental disorders due to victimization and a negative self-image.

Children with race dysphoria maybe preoccupied with cross-race issues and as such interfere with their academic performance.